Not Martha

bake local – Stone-Buhr flour from the PNW

Stone-Buhr Northwest-Grown All-Purpose Flour

If you want to feel extra-cozy-good about your baked goods this holiday season and you happen to live in the Pacific Northwest you should keep an eye out for Stone-Buhr Northwest-Grown All-Purpose Flour. All of the wheat is grown by Northwest family farmers, milled in Spokane, Washington and certified sustainable by the Food Alliance. And, as somebody told me, “they can damn near trace every 5lb bag back to the farmer.” A five pound bag is $3.99, the low price is because less fuel is needed to get the product to you. Neat huh? You have my permission to let your smug Prius-driving cousin know this.

You can find the flour at QFC, HagGen Foods and even some WalMarts, and online at Chef Tools.

Little bit of trivia, the company was originally local to Seattle: “Charles E. Young opened the Young-Stone Buhr Milling Co in 1914, then located in the Fremont neighborhood in Seattle, WA.”

A few local chefs have created recipes to help promote the flour which I’ve been given permission (thank you!) to include here. Below the fold you’ll find a Holiday Tart from Leslie Mackey of the Macrina Bakery and a bunch of lovely cookies from Thierry Rautureau of Rovers. Also, Orangette recommended seeking the flour, she talked about it in her entry on the big, famous, NY Times chocolate chip cookies.

Macrina Bakery & Café Holiday Tart

Macrina Bakery & Café Holiday Tart from Leslie Mackey

Flaky pastry:
Makes 2- 10” tart shells/ 1 double crust pie
2- 1/2 C Stone-Buhr Washington White All purpose flour
1- 1/2 t Salt
7 oz. Unsalted butter (Cold Cut in ¼” pieces)
3 oz. shortening, chilled
1/2 C Ice water

Filling: Makes 1- 10” tart
1 Cup chopped pecans
3 Eggs
2/3 Cup light brown sugar
2/3 Cup Light corn syrup
4 T Unsalted butter, melted & cooled to room temperature
1/2 t Salt
1 T Brandy or Pure vanilla
2 t Freshly grated orange zest (1 orange)
1-1/4 Cup Fresh cranberries
Powdered sugar to garnish

Combine flour and salt in the bowl of a stand mixer. Add the butter and with a paddle attachment combine on slow speed. Pulse for 2 – 3 minutes to cut in the butter. Add the chilled shortening in small pieces also. Pulse to cut in to mixture. When mixture resembles coarse crumb and begins to look wet add the ice water all at once. Mix until the dough is combined, about 30 seconds. Remove dough from bowl , onto plastic wrap. Wrap tightly and chill for 1 hour.

Using ½ the block of dough, roll out to a 14 round about 1/8” thick. Center on tart pan and fit in the fluted shell. Roll top over towards the center to reinforce the tart sides. Freeze or chill rolled shell for 30 minutes. Blind bake in a 375 oven for 30- 35 minutes. I prefer to place a piece of parchment paper over the shell and weight it with baking beans.
Reduce the oven temperature to 325 for baking the tart.

Spread pecans on a baking sheet and roast for 5- 10 minutes or until golden brown. Let cool.

Combine eggs, brown sugar, corn syrup, melted butter, salt brandy & orange zest in a medium bowl. Mix with a whisk until all ingredients are combined.

Scatter the roasted pecan pieces, whole fresh cranberries and sliced kumquats on the base of you pre-baked tart shell. Place tart on a baking sheet. Pour filling over and tart base and bake for 35 – 40 minutes. Custard will be set in the center and lightly brown on top. Let cool for 30 minutes. Dust with powdered sugar and serve with slightly sweetened whipped cream.

Cookies from Thierry Rautureau of Rovers

Cookies from Thierry Rautureau of Rovers

Butter Cookies
This trio of butter cookie variations—hazelnut, lemon, and chocolate—is delightfully versatile. The dough can be cut into any number of shapes or sizes to match the way in which they’ll be served. The cookies could be served with coffee after dessert, or as an afternoon snack.

The dough can be frozen for up to 1 week if you would like to save a portion for later use. Be sure the dough is well wrapped, in a couple of layers of plastic wrap. Allow the dough to defrost in the refrigerator for a few hours before rolling it out.

Hazelnut Butter Cookies
You could also make this recipe using toasted and ground almonds or pecans.

1 cup finely ground, toasted hazelnuts
1/2 cup unsalted butter, at room temperature
1/3 cup sugar
1 1/4 cups all-purpose flour, sifted

Combine the nuts, butter, and sugar in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment and mix at medium speed until well blended. Gradually add the flour to the dough, with the mixer at medium-low speed. Blend until the mixture forms a smooth dough.

Form the dough into 2 flat disks and wrap each in plastic wrap. Refrigerate until firm, at least 30 minutes.
Preheat the oven to 350°F. Line 2 baking sheets with silicone baking mats or parchment paper.

Set 1 of the dough disks on a lightly floured work surface and let sit for a few minutes to soften slightly. Roll out the dough to a thickness of about 1/16 inch. Using a small knife or cookie cutters, cut the dough into preferred shapes. Arrange the cookies on the prepared baking sheets with an inch between them. Bake until the cookies are firm and lightly browned around the edges, 8 to 10 minutes. Let the cookies sit on the baking sheets for a few minutes, then carefully transfer to a wire rack to cool completely. Continue with any remaining dough.

Makes 2 to 4 dozen (depending on the size and shape)

Chocolate Butter Cookies

1/2 cup unsalted butter, at room temperature
1/3 cup powdered sugar, sifted
1/2 vanilla bean, split lengthwise, seeds scraped out, or 1/8 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
1 cup all-purpose flour
2 tablespoons cocoa powder

Combine the butter, powdered sugar, and vanilla seeds in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment and mix at medium speed until well blended. Sift together the flour and cocoa powder and gradually add it to the dough, with the mixer at medium-low speed. Blend until the mixture forms a smooth dough.

Form the dough into 2 flat disks and wrap each in plastic wrap. Refrigerate until firm, at least 30 minutes. Proceed as directed for the Hazelnut Butter Cookies.

Makes 2 to 4 dozen (depending on the size and shape)

Lemon Butter Cookies

1 cup powdered sugar, sifted
3/4 cup unsalted butter, at room temperature
1 egg
1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice
1 teaspoon finely grated lemon zest
1/2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
1/4 teaspoon pure lemon extract (optional)
2 cups all-purpose flour, sifted

Combine the powdered sugar and butter in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment and mix at medium speed until well blended. Add the egg, lemon juice, lemon zest, vanilla, and lemon extract and continue blending to evenly mix. Gradually add the flour, with the mixer at medium-low speed, and blend until the mixture forms a smooth dough.

Form the dough into 2 flat disks and wrap each in plastic wrap. Refrigerate until firm, at least 30 minutes. Proceed as directed for the Hazelnut Butter Cookies.

Makes 3 to 5 dozen (depending on the size and shape)

· comments [13] · 11-14-2008 · categories:food · recipes · seattle ·

13 responses so far ↓

  • 1 Michelle // Nov 14, 2008 at 9:45 am

    I started buying Stone-Buhr whole wheat flour at Bartell Drug before I even realized it was local. It’s hit-or-miss, but I think they usually have it around the holidays.

  • 2 megan // Nov 14, 2008 at 10:04 am

    Michelle – It’s a bit confusing, but only the Washington White is local, at least local of the sustainable/trace the grain back to the farmer sort. But I’m pretty sure the rest are grown in the USA, they talk about Montana grains in the various descriptions.

  • 3 Lecia // Nov 14, 2008 at 11:17 am

    Great post; I appreciate the emphasis on buying locally. These recipes look amazing!

  • 4 EatWell // Nov 14, 2008 at 12:17 pm

    OMG, the tart photo is making me light-headed! Thanks for all the recipes…I’m definitely trying at least a couple of them (starting with the tart).

    As for flour, I think I’m one step closer to getting dh to grow our own wheat so that I can grind our own flour. ;)

  • 5 Ahava // Nov 14, 2008 at 1:07 pm

    Those hazelnut butter cookies will be on the table tonight.

    I’ll have to watch for this flour.

  • 6 martha in mobile // Nov 14, 2008 at 1:15 pm

    The Holiday Tart looks very good–but the directions indicate sliced kumquats which are not in the ingredient list. Where do the kumquats kum frum?

  • 7 megan // Nov 14, 2008 at 3:28 pm

    Martha – Sorry, I don’t know, I’m just relaying the recipe that was sent to me.

  • 8 LoveMeKnot Creations // Nov 15, 2008 at 11:39 am

    oh neat! I’m up in Everett :)
    Haven’t seen that flour before, but i’ll admit i just look at packaging and if its pretty i’ll buy it haha, good to know there’s a local place i can support

  • 9 Laura // Nov 15, 2008 at 3:26 pm

    Hi Not Martha:

    What is the protein content of this flour like? Would it be better suited in breads or in pastries and muffins?

  • 10 Ali // Nov 17, 2008 at 5:34 am

    Thanks for this info – I wouldn’t have known about Stone-Buhr if it wasn’t for this post. I’ll look for it next time I’m out shopping!

  • 11 Ellen // Nov 17, 2008 at 10:04 am

    I found the Stone-Buhr flour on sale at my local Bartell Drugs for less than $3 for a 5 lb. bag on Sunday, 11/16. (Thanks to commenter Michelle, so I knew to be on the lookout.)

  • 12 Online Shopping Chick // Nov 17, 2008 at 10:19 pm

    How about chocolate hazelnut butter cookies? I bet they’d be twice as yummy. I’m all for experimenting in the kitchen. :)

  • 13 Emily // Nov 18, 2008 at 7:25 am

    Don’t forget about Fairhaven Flour Mill: organic, mostly locally grown. Started as a co-op. Good stuff. So’s Stone Buhr’s, but thought I’d plug my fave!

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