Not Martha

links: food

Whole-Grain Flapjacks at Hogwash

edible bowls and plates! at Chow

Chicken Chili with Black Beans at Hooked on Heat

Darlene Bakes from Jessica Seinfeld’s New Book at The Kitchen

rainy night chili and real recipeless chili at Metroblogging Seattle

corn and bacon pie at Splatgirl

How to cook beans? at Ask Metafilter

seeking apple desserts at Ask Metafilter

the Pizzeria is a ceramic mini-oven at Popgadget

Make cotton candy from hard candies at Popgadget

make your own udon, these look lucious, at Cook & Eat

no-knead chocolate breat at Su Good Sweets, via The Food Section

The Hydrox Cookie Is Dead, and Fans Won’t Get Over It at the Wall Street Journal, via The Morning News

homemade bacon vodka (bacon! vodka!) at Brownie Points

I did a little research on baking stones recently since somebody wrote to ask about them. We agreed we’re too ashamed to pay for one from a kitchen store after all the “just buy a brick from Home Depot” advice we get. But, how do you not buy a toxic brick?! I bookmarked these: cheaper baking stone option, baking stone recommendations at Chowhound, pizza stone alternative at Techguy forums, and create a pizza oven for $5 at Curbly.

· comments [10] · 01-22-2008 · categories:food · recipes ·

10 responses so far ↓

  • 1 Abby // Jan 22, 2008 at 7:15 am

    The Hydrox cookie story was great. Thanks for finding it for us! (And I think oreos STILL coat your mouth with … something unpleasant.)

  • 2 Patti // Jan 22, 2008 at 7:33 am

    I think baking stones are exactly like kiln shelves – the ones at Seattle Pottery look just like my (much more expensive) stone. I suspect kiln shelves are not toxic because they’re in a kiln with ceramics meant for food.

  • 3 Anna // Jan 22, 2008 at 7:48 am

    funny that you mention pizza stones – i was just talking about this with some friends a couple days ago. one of them recommends getting an *unglazed* flower pot saucer (a biggish one) and placing it upside down in the bottom of your over. apparently his cost about $6 and lasted for about 2 years before he accidentally broke it.
    on the other hand, another friend has had his ‘real’ pizza stone for 12 years – so maybe the more expensive ones are worth it in the long run.

  • 4 Russel // Jan 22, 2008 at 9:59 am

    Kiln shelves work great! All my potter friends who are into pizza and haven’t already built their own pizza ovens use them all the time. They’re available in round, octagonal and in all kinds of sizes and they last, they’re meant to take the heat. You want a mullite kiln shelf. It will be kind of a yellowish-beige color. As far as seasoning them, do what ever the ‘real’ pizza stone vendors tell you to do. It’s the same material. If you take care of it, it will last a life time.

  • 5 Mat // Jan 22, 2008 at 12:49 pm

    I’m kind of interested in trying a bacon vodka screwdriver. hm.

  • 6 Megan // Jan 22, 2008 at 1:58 pm

    I’ve had a Williams Sonoma stone for about 8 years and it’s still going strong – a cheaper one I got from Target before that snapped in two one day while the oven was heating up.
    My brother went to Home Depot and asked someone there about buying unglazed tiles to use for baking – that person recommended something that ended up being a total bust – the pizza adhered to stone like mortar. The kiln shelf idea is interesting, though.

  • 7 paola // Jan 22, 2008 at 4:20 pm

    Thanks for the chili links. Now I’m in the US methinks I need to upgrade my very British chili (and yes that’s a contradiction in terms) recipe…

  • 8 Annie // Jan 22, 2008 at 5:06 pm

    Oh wow, I love cotton candy!

  • 9 Pug Matt // Jan 22, 2008 at 7:39 pm

    re: how to get a non-toxic stone.

    What I recall from Alton Brown / Good Eats is to get an “unglazed quarry tile”

    You can see the Lowe’s page about tile — http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn?action=howTo&p=BuyGuide/ChooseFloorTile.html — which says:

    “Ceramic: Unglazed — (Also called quarry tiles). The pigment or natural color is present during firing and is part of the tile itself. Unglazed tile needs sealing for stain resistance.”

  • 10 McAuliflower // Jan 23, 2008 at 10:12 am

    thanks for the linky love Megan.

    The vodka is dang easy to make. I’m trying to not let myself try a Bacon Greyhound for breakfast…

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